Wow!  That is a very important question!  How important is your horse’s gut health?  What do you believe as a horse owner?  For some owners and horses, the connection is real, such as in the case of ulcers, recurrent colic, or irritable bowel type of conditions, but for others, it may not be so obvious. …

Read More

The equine digestive or gastrointestinal microbiome is a vast organ system within an organ system, that can greatly impact horse health and soundness.  It is a complex system of hundreds of different microorganisms that not only impact digestion, but overall health and inflammation within the horse. When this system is out of balance, a dysbiosis…

Read More

Digestion.  It is a simple, yet, very complex process in the horse that is often overlooked by owners and veterinarians.  We often see it as just being a matter of putting food into the mouth, then the stomach, and all will be well in the end.  Although that concept is rather simple, the process is…

Read More

Colic conditions in the horse are very common, impacting likely upwards of 20% of all horses at some point in time in their lives.  Not all horses do experience colic, as noted by the percentages.  In those horses that do experience colic, some are isolated events, while some tend to recur over and over again.…

Read More

The equine gastrointestinal microbiome is a fascinating entity that is present within the digestive tract. The balance of the hundreds of bacterial microorganisms within the horse’s digestive tract can either dictate health or disease, contributing on many levels outside of pure digestion.  In past research, we have demonstrated how an overgrowth of lactic acid bacteria…

Read More

Gastrointestinal health and microbial balance has been connected with a host of clinical health problems in both humans and animals, including the horse.  The normal gastrointestinal flora is involved in stimulation of the immune system, synthesis of vitamins (B and K), enhancement of GI motility and function, digestion and nutrient absorption, inhibition of pathogens, metabolism of plant and drug compounds and synthesis of short chain fatty acids.1,9,11  

Read More

Introduction

Intestinal bacterial overgrowth has been a recognized condition in humans, often correlated with systemic health conditions ranging from allergies to cancer, and is a common connection with obesity. Intestinal hyperpermeability or leaky gut syndrome, is a primary problem that has been also related to various health conditions, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, multi-organ failure, kidney disease, liver ailments and a common consequence to radiation or chemotherapy.  The connection between the two is that through the process of increased permeability, bacteria may gain access to the systemic circulation, contributing to organ infection and immune dysfunction. (1,5,6,14)

Read More